Osceola County Welcome Center and History Museum

Osceola County Welcome Center and History Museum located at 4155 W. Vine St. in Kissimmee. Listen to the crying sounds of the Limpkin bird while learning about the native people that survived living in the cypress swamp. Coacoochee a Seminole Warrior fought in the Seminole Wars. From early hunting tools to the River otter, Raccoon, Alligator and the Panther an endangered species all found in the swamp.

Early settlers to Florida included the Cadman family from England who built a citrus packinghouse and Hamilton Disston a wealthy tycoon from Philadelphia who bought four million acres of land in Florida and built a sugar plantation. The Shakers, a religious community owned a commercial fishing and pineapple farm.Trains came to Kissimmee in the early 1880s. The rails eventually extended to Tampa. People would ride the train from Sanford to Kissimmee then stay at a downtown hotel. They would board the Steamer Lillie to take day trips or 4-day trips along the Kissimmee Chain of Lakes.

“Tin Can” tourists a name given to people who traveled to Florida in their cars, sometimes slept in tents and ate out of tin cans. An exhibit on display until October of this year show cooking utensils, bedrolls and other items necessary for traveling on the road. Trailer Topics, a magazine geared for people who owned trailers and a model of an early Airstream on display.

A replica of the 3,700-pound bronze sculpture on display at the Osceola County Courthouse that celebrates Osceola County’s Centennial.

 

 

 

 

Different species of mammals and reptiles found in the hammock. The Red Shouldered Hawk and the Yellow-bellied sapsucker a few of the birds found in hardwood and cypress trees. The Whopping Crane, an endangered bird, Osprey, a hawk and a Bald Eagle all popular with bird watchers. A replica of a Bald Eagle nest on display.

I walked around the museum and was in awe of the dioramas that are on display. The workmanship that went into building them is phenomenal. Stop inside the gift shop that is a replica of a steamship. Children’s books and books on the first one-hundred years. Jars of raw natural honey from the honey farm, coffee mugs and other items sold in the gift shop. Free entrance to the museum, donations accepted.

 

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Sulphur Springs Museum and Heritage Center

Sulphur Springs Museum and Heritage Center located on the grounds of the MANN-WAGNON MEMORIAL PARK on 1101 East River Cove Street in Tampa. Sulphur Springs a community established in the late 1800s. The museum exhibit depicts the history of Sulphur Springs from the tourists who visited to the people who lived in the community.

People came from around the country for the therapeutic health benefits of the natural springs. Activities for the tourists who visited Sulphur Springs included a community pool that people watched competitive swimming and a Toboggan Slide. Reproductions of postcards of the era shown along the wall. The locals as well as the tourists would shop at the Arcade a Mediterranean style building. The Water Tower built in the late 1920s provided water for the increasing number of tourists who came to Sulphur Springs. In the late 1980s, the tower designated an historic landmark but no longer in use.

 

 

 

 

 

Urchins, Conchs, Sponges and other forms of sea life displayed in the aquarium exhibit. Walk through the museum and read the Poster Exhibits about Coral Reefs. “Coral Reefs are in Danger” and the eight ways to solve the problem. “Coral Reefs Nurseries of the Sea” show different species found in the reefs. The age, length and how food and shelter provide for the different fish species indicated in “Coral Reefs Are Amazing.”

A shark exhibit will dispel any misconceptions that people have about sharks. Seven species of sharks and 3 kinds of Hammerheads found in Tampa Bay.

 

 

 

 

Bring a picnic lunch and sit under a pavilion or under a garden trestle, relax while looking out at the Hillsborough River. Learn about the different sea creatures and other exhibits at the museum. Free admission to the museum, donations accepted.